Landscape In Thread: The Art Of Martha Fieber

Muted Vibrants

Muted Vibrants

Detail View of Muted Vibrants

Detail View of Muted Vibrants

 “Nature has infinite variation and beauty.  
With such a vast resource, inspiration is unlimited”. ~Martha Fieber
Brightly Colored Birch: Van Winkle Lake

Brightly Colored Birch: Van Winkle Lake

Redbud in Bloom

Redbud in Bloom

Forget Me Not Field 

Forget Me Not Field 

Birch Against Orange

Birch Against Orange

Dusting

Dusting

Detail View of Dusting

Detail View of Dusting

At first glance you may mistake one of Martha Fieber's landscapes as a traditional painting. Upon a closer look you will see lines, dashes and knots created by layers of delicate thread. It is a delightful discovery to look close and then again—even more closely to see the small stitches that go into these remarkable landscapes that range from 3" x 5" up to 8" x 24". There is both a precision and a freedom in the quality of the stitches that leaves one wondering if perhaps these embroidered landscapes were created in much the same way a painting would be executed—starting with an overall plan that slowly evolves into something greater—layer after layer, stitch after stitch. 


Martha writes about her work:
"My art is about texture, technique, pattern, and detail. Each work includes layers and layers of stitching to create shading and depth. I have been working with fiber since I was old enough to handle a needle. In 1999, I gave up engineering for art. It has been a joy to create original embroideries and work with fiber for my second career."

"I use all kinds of threads, fibers, and colors to create depth and texture in my work. 
Single strand silk, rayon, metallic, and/or hand dyed cotton threads, on linen and silk backgrounds comprise most of my current work."
Forest Grove

Forest Grove

In the piece above, Forest Grove, Fieber offers up a dynamic landscape from a birds eye view. We look down at a grove of trees, with foreshortened trunks; tiny knots referencing spring blossoms quietly hover over the haphazard ground below with its criss-crossed, imperfect stitches, creating movement that surrounds the seeming stillness of the pink, yellow and green knots above. It is the juxtaposition of the perfect against the imperfect that is so interesting— each stitch behind and below the trees looks as if it were quickly rendered; drawn not sewn. 

Fieber taught herself to embroider and weave. She dyes the fibers used in her work with plants she finds locally. For more information on Martha Fieber's work please visit her website hereAdditionally, Fieber's work is on exhibit at the Katie Gingrass Gallery in Milwaukee, WI. through February 28, 2015.